homepage1.jpg (19349 bytes)

dalhousie.jpg (14616 bytes)
This web site is a part of the heritage project taken up
by Prabal Pramanik’s Academy of Arts


Bhamlada, Bhatwan, Punjab-145 022, India
Web site :
www.academyartprabal.com
e-mail : prabalpramanik@yahoo.co.uk

homepage2.jpg (23961 bytes)
HISTORY OF
DALHOUSIE
HISTORY TIME CHART
OF DALHOUSIE
LIFE IN DALHOUSIE AN ARTIST'S VIEW
OF DALHOUSIE
BOOKS, PORTFOLIOS
& CDS ON DALHOUSIE
DALHOUSIE CLUB
KHAJJIAR AND KALATOP DALHOUSIE PHOTO
GALLERY
TOURIST INFORMATION NOTED PEOPLE IN
HISTORY OF DALHOUSIE
WILD LIFE HOME PAGE

Every town has its own character. The roots of this character can be traced in the history of the particular town. The history of any place has different phases.
The hill town of Dalhousie in Western Himalayas in Himachal Pradesh being only one hundred and fifty years old, has just four major phases in its history.
The first phase was when the area was a virgin forest covered hills. Shephards must have visited this area at times and perhaps rural people went trekking through the forest area.
Some times the Rajas and chieftains with their men came and hunted there. The hills and the forests of alpine beauty at this place do not seem to have any human settlement worth mentioning.
Flora and fauna flourished in abundance. We don’t find the remains any ancient temples or for tresses here. The second phase in the history of this area began with the coming of the British.
The British people who first saw this place undoubted by was struck by the similarity of this area with European hilly region and had a great liking for this area.
Dalhousie was built up by the British to be a home away from their home, so many miles away. This sanctuary of Europeans was developed in the style of an English town. They setup institutions to satisfy their own needs and built the road from Pathankot for communication. Dalhousie town in victorian and Edwardain times must have looked distinctly like any provincial British town complete with ladies wearing long gowns and men in long coats and top hats.
British army officers must have found this place quite homely and easy to adjust with. The social life of these European residents of Dalhousie and the cantonment area was naturally confined to their own community except when some missionaries approached local hill people to involve them in their institutions of welfare with the purpose of spreading Christianity.
The British residents of this area thought that the sun will never set on the British Empire and their days of holding the position of the ruling class will continue.
They must have thought that “the natives” will go on serving them as “Chowkidars”, “Khansamas”, “Coolies” and “ayas”.
Little did they imagine that the “established” British empire would crumble with the turn of the wheel of time. A new destiny dawned over India with the independence and the third phase of this town started in an independent land. Dalhousie though situated in the hills was still joined to Punjab. Real development of these hill area began with the creation of Himachal state. This is the fourth phases in the history of Dalhousie. Today Himachal is one of the fastest developing states of India and the people oriented development projects in Himachal have made life easier for the hill people.
In todays Dalhousie the memories of British Raj remain only through a few churches, the cemetery and a few old buildings. The Club House, that was the community center of Europeans and army officers remain.
Indians have taken over Dalhousie completely and have Indianized the area. In the history of Dalhousie, the names of prominent Indians such as Rabindranath Tagore, Subhash Chandra Bose, Sardar Ajit Singh, Raizada Hansraj are much more important than he name of any British person including Lord Dalhousie, who never visited this place even.
It has become a tourist center where people come on holidays and school and college students come on excursions.
The hills in areas undisturbed by man, are still covered by wild flowers in spring and by snow in Winter as they were before man set his foot on these hills.
From the heritage aspect, Dalhousie town is entirely different from Chamba or other old Himachal towns, where ancient temples, fudal fortresses and other architectural remains speak of ancient history. This relative young settlement from the heritage point of view, has much to say about the life, and values at the time of the British rule, that is just a distant echo today.
Prabal Pramanik

DALHOUSIE-map1.jpg (49615 bytes)

 

chur1.jpg (23516 bytes)        bazar3.jpg (25559 bytes)      bazar4.jpg (32574 bytes)

 

YOU ARE WELCOME TO
VISIT OUR OTHER WEB SITES

www.papercuttingartprabal.com
www.academyartprabal.com
www.artprabal.com
www.pathankotheritage.com
www.chambaheritage.net
www.orientbookco.com

bus-stand.jpg (30595 bytes)

Dal-club.jpg (36727 bytes)

bazar.jpg (25767 bytes)

bazar6.jpg (32705 bytes)

 

 

Web design by Arup Chandra
Multimedia Studio, Bhamlada, Bhatwan, Punjab 145 022, India
Pictures and text copyright reserved by Prabal Pramanik